Employee CPR & AED Training

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Certified! Select LA 18 employees recently received CPR & AED training and certification by Holly Calig and Jim Baca of Child and Parent Resources, in partnership with American Heart Association. Employees from each department learned the first critical steps to take when someone passes out or chokes, how to conduct CPR and chest compression, and how to use an AED defibrillator.

 

(l-r: Jim Baca, Child and Parent Resources instructor; Cindy J. Lee, LA 18 Community & Public Affairs Manager; Holly Calig, Child and Parent Resources instructor)
(l-r: Jim Baca, Child and Parent Resources instructor; Cindy J. Lee, LA 18 Community & Public Affairs Manager; Holly Calig, Child and Parent Resources instructor)

 
The Heartsaver AED program targets all lay responders, such as teachers, firefighters, police, commercial airline crews, security personnel, employees in the workplace, family members of patients at high risk for sudden cardiac death, and other laypersons. Students will learn to recognize the signs of four major emergencies-heart attack, stroke, cardiac arrest and foreign-body airway obstruction. These responders learn Adult/Child CPR, hands-on practice scenarios with an AED, relief of choking in adults and children, and the use of barrier devices.

 

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CPR Facts and Stats (American Heart Association):

Why Learn CPR?
Cardiac arrest – an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs – is a leading cause of death. Each year, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States.

When a person has a cardiac arrest, survival depends on immediately getting CPR from someone nearby. Almost 90 percent of people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. CPR, especially if performed in the first few minutes of cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival.

Be the Difference for Someone You Love
If you are called on to give CPR in an emergency, you will most likely be trying to save the life of someone you love: a child, a spouse, a parent or a friend. 70 percent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests happen in homes. Unfortunately, only about 46% of people who experience an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest get the immediate help that they need before professional help arrives.

Music Can Help Save Lives
During CPR, you should push on the chest at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute. The beat of “Stayin’ Alive” is a perfect match for this.


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